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Student Housing

Hall To The Chief

March 6, 1947

The University of Kansas signs a lease for a new residence hall that will take the name of a famed Kansa chief – thanks to a set of hand-me-down silverware.

The Lime Of Their Lives

January 24, 1942

The KU Endowment Association announces acquisition of the house that will become Jolliffe Hall, a building that will serve variously as a residence hall for undergraduate men and women, and be slathered in lime green paint for much of its existence.

“We All Missed Hilden Gibson”

April 1, 1955

Dr. Hilden Gibson, a popular political science professor and strong supporter of KU’s cooperative housing movement, unexpectedly passes away, inspiring the men of 1614 Kentucky Street to name their co-op in his honor.

Chant’s Encounters

February 4, 1941

The Rock Chalk Co-op, housing approximately 25 men in a rented Rhode Island Street home, begins its formal existence in time for the start of spring semester 1941 classes.

Artful Lodgers

January 22, 1946

Amid a post-World War II campus housing crunch, the University Daily Kansan reports that 80 male students – nearly all returned veterans – will soon move into the basement of present-day Spooner Hall, then known as the Spooner-Thayer Museum of Art.

Gather Together

January 12, 1922

The Young Women’s Christian Association acquires Henley House, which will become a “gathering place” for KU women and the scene of an “experiment” in integrated undergraduate student housing.

“The House With Five Roofs”

August 13, 1959

The University of Kansas announces that demolition of Locksley Hall, one of the most unusual living arrangements on the KU campus, will be completed by September 1, 1959.

Foster Care

December 4, 1955

After serving as “temporary” women’s housing for 12 years, Foster Hall finally becomes a men’s scholarship residence as originally intended.

Mixed Doubles

February 19, 1951

The University Daily Kansan reports on the formation of what is thought to be the country’s first housing co-op for married students.

Go With The Overflow

June 12, 1951

The Summer Session Kansan reports that a wood-frame house at 1115 Louisiana Street, recently acquired by the University of Kansas for use as a women’s dormitory, will be named in honor of the late Frank Hodder, a longtime KU history professor and the original owner of the home.

Principle Residence

February 1, 1951

The men of the just established Rochdale Co-op begin their first semester of classes from their new Ohio Street home.

The Pines Of Mount Oread

September 18, 1950

The Twin Pines Co-op, housing 25 men in a rented Ohio Street home, begins its formal existence in time for the start of the fall 1950 semester.

Jocks’ Niche

August 14, 1950

The University of Kansas purchases the residence located at 1043 Indiana Street, which will become known as “Varsity House” and serve as a dormitory principally for KU football players during the 1950s.

A Bunch Of SOBs

October 8, 1949

The University announces that a recently acquired Louisiana Street home will be called Oliver Hall, in honor of KU’s first chancellor, paving the way for it to become part of a two-house complex known as Sterling-Oliver that will join KU’s scholarship hall system.