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Sciences

High On Helium

December 7, 1905

In KU’s Bailey Hall, chemistry professors Hamilton P. Cady and David F. McFarland discover that helium can be extracted from natural gas.

Natural Observer

April 1, 1874

The Observer of Nature, KU’s first serious student publication, issues its premiere edition.

It’s All In The Delivery

October 17, 1984

More than 200 “internationally known scientists from Europe, Japan and the U.S” descend on the Lawrence Holiday Inn Holidome for a symposium on “Directed Drug Delivery” held in honor of KU professor Takeru Higuchi, the “father of physical pharmacy.”

Fly Us To The Moon

December 7, 1972

Commander Ronald E. Evans becomes the first KU alumnus in space when he and two other astronauts of Apollo 17 blast off from Cape Kennedy on NASA’s sixth and final 20th century manned mission to the moon.

“Just What We Need”

May 21, 1959

KU speech clinician Dick Schiefelbusch presents preliminary research indicating that children with profound mental retardation can learn.

Snow’s Day

June 8, 1930

Present-day Snow Hall is dedicated, replacing the original Snow Hall that had fallen into disrepair.

Water On The Brain

February 23, 1895

KU physics and engineering professor, Lucien I. Blake, successfully transmits the first long distance ship-to-shore message using underwater wireless technology.

Northern Exposure

July 7, 1894

KU’s Lewis Lindsay Dyche leaves New York as official naturalist on the ill-starred Cook expedition to the North Pole.

“Nothing Like It In The World”

May 1, 1893

The Panorama of North American Mammals, a version of which is now located in the University of Kansas Natural History Museum in Dyche Hall, debuts as the centerpiece of the Kansas pavilion at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

Driven Snow

April 11, 1890

The Kansas Board of Regents elects natural science professor Francis H. Snow the University’s fifth chancellor.