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Civil Rights History

Sisters Act

February 4, 1972

A women’s advocacy group calling themselves the February Sisters occupy the East Asian Studies building in an effort to win concessions from the University.

“We Shall Overcome”

March 8, 1965

The KU Civil Rights Council holds a student sit-in in the office of Chancellor W. Clarke Wescoe, the country’s second largest such demonstration to date.

“There Is Too Much Talk Here About Segregation”

March 5, 1934

Kansas Representative William H. Blount convenes a hearing in Topeka to investigate racial discrimination at the University of Kansas, with particular focus on the Medical School’s exclusionary practices that prevent African American students from completing medical degrees at KU.

Fully Integrated

July 1, 1986

The Spencer Research Library's African American Experience Collection gets its real beginning as a federal grant enables the library to assemble the often overlooked documentary record left behind by Kansas’ African American population in a more focused fashion than ever before.

Rejecting Rejection

August 8, 1938

Under pressure from civil rights leaders and Kansas Governor Walter Huxman, the Kansas Board of Regents votes to prohibit the de facto practices that had prevented African American students from completing their medical education at the University of Kansas School of Medicine.