A passion of the KU Memorial Union
  • Spooner Hall, the oldest continuously used academic building on the campus of the University of Kansas, marks its one-hundredth anniversary.
  • The Fort Scott Daily Monitor glowingly describes KU's new University Hall (later Fraser Hall), asserting "There is no structure on the American continent … equal to this in size or surpassing it in adaptness for the purposes of higher education."
  • KU formally dedicates the original Green Hall, home of the School of Law.
  • The University of Kansas purchases the residence located at 1043 Indiana Street, which will become known as “Varsity House” and serve as a dormitory principally for KU football players during the 1950s.
  • KU dedicates the $13.9 million Marian and Fred Anschutz Science Library.
The Fort Scott Daily Monitor glowingly describes KU's new University Hall (later Fraser Hall), asserting "There is no structure on the American continent … equal to this in size or surpassing it in adaptness for the purposes of higher education."
Ferdinand Fuller, architect of KU’s first building and a member of the original party sent to Kansas by the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society, dies at his home near Lawrence.
The Kansas Legislature authorizes $50,000 for the construction of a new physics and electrical engineering building, a striking structure resembling a French chateau now remembered as “old” Blake Hall.
Fire destroys KU’s engineering building and heating plant, prompting Kansas City businessman George A. Fowler to donate $18,000 to rebuild the facilities, which became known as the Fowler Shops.
KU formally dedicates the original Green Hall, home of the School of Law.
KU dedicates Marvin Hall to house the School of Engineering and Haworth Hall for the Departments of Mineralogy and Geology.
The Presbyterian Church celebrates a Dedicatory Service for Westminster Hall, a new religious center for University of Kansas students that will end up serving as a women’s dormitory from 1933 to 1946.
A Commencement regatta and other aquatic athletic events mark the completion of Potter Lake.
Nearly 1,000 women attend a rally at the original Robinson Gymnasium to call for the construction of a women’s dormitory that ultimately will become Corbin Hall.
In a special referendum, Rosedale voters approve a $30,000 bond issue, enabling acquisition of today’s KU Medical Center campus site and convincing state legislators to approve $435,000 for a new hospital and other Medical School additions.
Four thousand KU students and faculty members tear down McCook Field, clearing the way for the construction of present-day Memorial Stadium.
The Young Women’s Christian Association acquires Henley House, which will become a “gathering place” for KU women and the scene of an “experiment” in integrated undergraduate student housing.
The University celebrates Armistice Day by formally dedicating Memorial Stadium, built to honor the 130 KU students and alumni who gave their lives in World War I.
Watson Library opens for student use.
Present-day Snow Hall is dedicated, replacing the original Snow Hall that had fallen into disrepair.
Watkins Memorial Hospital is officially opened in what is now present-day Twente Hall.  
KU's Prairie Acre is formally set aside to “preserve Nature’s sweet fashion of making Her own garden.”
After the state architect declares Dyche Hall structurally unsound, the Board of Regents closes KU’s Natural History Museum for a period that will end up lasting nine years.
The Summer Session Kansan announces that renovations are nearly complete on “The Outlook,” the new official KU chancellor’s residence – a willed gift from the recently deceased University benefactress Elizabeth Watkins.
Charter members of the Jayhawk Co-op formally adopt a constitution, establishing their Kentucky Street residence as the first independent cooperative housing arrangement at KU.
Campus House becomes a formally recognized independent women’s residence hall approved by the University.
University Chancellor Deane W. Malott announces that a recently acquired mansion being transformed into a men’s scholarship hall will be named in honor of Olin Templin, longtime KU administrator and professor.
KU begins renovations that will transform the former official chancellor’s residence at 1345 Louisiana Street into a men’s scholarship dormitory known as Carruth Hall.
The Rock Chalk Co-op, housing approximately 25 men in a rented Rhode Island Street home, begins its formal existence in time for the start of spring semester 1941 classes.
1121 Ohio Street becomes the first of four Mount Oread-area men’s housing cooperatives that will bear the name of John Moore.
After obtaining a federal priority rating by agreeing that Lindley Hall would “assume defense tasks” for the duration of World War II, KU begins work on the construction of its new mineral industries building.
The KU Endowment Association announces acquisition of the house that will become Jolliffe Hall, a building that will serve variously as a residence hall for undergraduate men and women, and be slathered in lime green paint for much of its existence.
The University announces that a newly acquired residence hall at 1011 Indiana Street has been named in honor of former longtime KU English professor Dr. Edwin M. Hopkins.
Hillcrest House, located less than a block from KU’s campus, formally begins its run as an “organized house” for independent women students.
A portion of the Lawrence Women’s Club becomes a temporary student residence hall during KU’s post-World War II housing crunch.
Amid a post-World War II campus housing crunch, the University Daily Kansan reports that 80 male students – nearly all returned veterans – will soon move into the basement of present-day Spooner Hall, then known as the Spooner-Thayer Museum of Art.
Danforth Chapel is officially dedicated.
Kansas Governor Andrew Schoeppel announces that KU will receive a surplus US Army barracks building, a structure that will become the 160-man dormitory known as Oread Hall.
KU formally announces that the Kappa Sigma fraternity house will cease its temporary wartime function as a women’s dormitory known as Tipperary Hall.
The University Daily Kansan reports that a Vermont Street church has become a temporary men’s student residence.
Male students begin moving into makeshift quarters underneath the east-wing stands of Memorial Stadium, an emergency post-World War II housing arrangement known as McCook Hall.
The University of Kansas signs a lease for a new residence hall that will take the name of a famed Kansa chief – thanks to a set of hand-me-down silverware.
The Summer Session Kansan reports that the Sleepy Hollow women's residence hall will become the new home of the Don Henry Co-op.
Following more than two months of heavy labor spent converting a former horse barn into a livable student residence, a dozen KU men move into what will become known as the Hill Co-op.
The University announces that a recently acquired Louisiana Street home will be called Oliver Hall, in honor of KU’s first chancellor, paving the way for it to become part of a two-house complex known as Sterling-Oliver that will join KU’s scholarship hall system.
The University of Kansas purchases the residence located at 1043 Indiana Street, which will become known as “Varsity House” and serve as a dormitory principally for KU football players during the 1950s.
The Twin Pines Co-op, housing 25 men in a rented Ohio Street home, begins its formal existence in time for the start of the fall 1950 semester.
The men of the just established Rochdale Co-op begin their first semester of classes from their new Ohio Street home.
The Memorial Carillon and Campanile, a monument to the 277 KU men and women who died in World War II, is formally dedicated atop Mount Oread.
The Summer Session Kansan reports that a wood-frame house at 1115 Louisiana Street, recently acquired by the University of Kansas for use as a women’s dormitory, will be named in honor of the late Frank Hodder, a longtime KU history professor and the original owner of the home.
The KU Endowment Association acquires Pioneer Cemetery, Lawrence’s first burial ground, after Chancellor Franklin Murphy and his daughters stumble upon the neglected site.
Dedication of KU’s Allen Field House takes place on the night of the Jayhawks’ only home conference victory of the 1954-55 season.
After serving as “temporary” women’s housing for 12 years, Foster Hall finally becomes a men’s scholarship residence as originally intended.
The University of Kansas announces that demolition of Locksley Hall, one of the most unusual living arrangements on the KU campus, will be completed by September 1, 1959.
The Kansas Board of Regents votes funds to replace the original Fraser Hall, claiming it had "outlived its usefulness."
KU unveils preliminary architectural plans for its new humanities building, later named Wescoe Hall, a 25-story skyscraper that would have been the tallest building in Kansas.
Ground is broken for the construction of the Satellite Student Union, now known as the Burge Student Union that was named in honor of Frank Burge, longtime director of the Kansas Union.
Joe Smith, owner of the popular late-night spot Joe's Bakery, retires from the daily operation of the store after 28 years. His son Ralph re-opens the operation when classes resume in the fall.
KU dedicates its Vietnam Memorial in Marvin Grove, becoming the first university in the country to build such a monument.
KU dedicates the $13.9 million Marian and Fred Anschutz Science Library.
Spooner Hall, the oldest continuously used academic building on the campus of the University of Kansas, marks its one-hundredth anniversary.
Strong Hall becomes the fourth KU building to merit a listing on the National Register of Historic Places.
Bailey Hall, one of the University’s oldest buildings, is entered on the National Register of Historic Places.
KU announces that its 1887 powerhouse building will be transformed into a new home for the Hall Center for the Humanities.
Subscribe to Places

KU Today
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times