A passion of the KU Memorial Union
  • The University announces that the “Men of 1011,” founders of the first semi-organized house for KU students, will move from their Indiana Street home into the original chancellor’s residence at 1345 Louisiana.
  • In what will be the final crowning of a Homecoming Queen, KU awards the tiara to Janet Merrick, a senior from Johnson County.
  • Two dozen male KU students gather on Mount Oread to form what will become the KU Marching Jayhawks.
  • The Observer of Nature, KU’s first serious student publication, issues its premiere edition.
  • Dr. F.W. Blackmar, the first Dean of the Graduate School from 1889-1929, attempts to explain the origin of the Kansas Jayhawk during KU's Radio Nite program.
James Lane's Jayhawkers take up residence in the East Room of the White House to protect the President. Lincoln's assistant wrote "The White House has turned into a barracks. Jim Lane marshaled his Kansas Warriors...the western Jayhawkers..." Hay described Lane as a "gaunt, tattered, uncombed and unshorn figure."
The Observer of Nature, KU’s first serious student publication, issues its premiere edition.
Chancellor James Marvin leads the first concerted “campus beautification” campaign at KU, a joint student-faculty effort on Arbor Day that culminates in the planting of more than 300 trees on Mount Oread and sets the stage for the development of present-day Marvin Grove.
Professor Edgar Henry Summerfield Bailey first proposes the cheer that will evolve into the “Rock Chalk, Jayhawk, K.U.” yell.
Eight KU professors establish the University’s chapter of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa honor society, the first west of the Mississippi and the 31st nationwide.
Male students participate in the first "Maypole Scrap," a rowdy fracas that will be a KU tradition and popular spectator sport for over a dozen years.
After nearly twenty years of short-lived niche publications of uneven quality, a student-run newspaper, the Kansas University Weekly, emerges with the “official approval and support of the University.”
Two dozen male KU students gather on Mount Oread to form what will become the KU Marching Jayhawks.
The Semi-Weekly Kansan, forerunner of today’s University Daily Kansan, makes its debut on campus with the support of faculty, administration, and students alike.
The first four graduates of KU’s Training School for Nurses receive their diplomas.
Electric trolleys from the Lawrence city system initiate 23 years of streetcar service to the KU campus.
The University Daily Kansan becomes the first college daily newspaper in the Sunflower State.
The campus power plant steam whistle begins marking the end of each hour’s classes.
From the Lawrence Daily Journal-World for March 14, 1913:
The Sour Owl, a KU student publication featuring salacious gossip and bawdy sexual humor, issues the premiere edition of its intermittent 40-year run.
The Kansas Engineer first appears on campus.
The first group of KU women "do their bit" to support the country by enrolling in Red Cross classes as America edges closer to war.
KFKU, the University’s first radio station, makes its inaugural broadcast.
First issue of The Dove, a purportedly “radical” student newspaper generally printed on pink paper, makes its campus debut.
Dr. F.W. Blackmar, the first Dean of the Graduate School from 1889-1929, attempts to explain the origin of the Kansas Jayhawk during KU's Radio Nite program.
The University announces that the “Men of 1011,” founders of the first semi-organized house for KU students, will move from their Indiana Street home into the original chancellor’s residence at 1345 Louisiana.
The University Daily Kansan records the passing of Hobo Day, an often rowdy “annual festival of rags” in which KU students dressed in hobo costumes to show school spirit and cause “a great deal of unnecessary trouble.”
Forty World War II veterans, enrolled as freshmen at KU, refuse to don “freshman caps,” thus marking the beginning of the end of this controversial, decades-old tradition.
The University Daily Kansan reports the opening of a new cooperative living residence on Massachusetts Street named after KU student Don Henry, who had been killed while serving with the Loyalist side in the Spanish Civil War.
The University Daily Kansan reports on the formation of what is thought to be the country’s first housing co-op for married students.
Approximately 1,500 undergraduate KU men engage in the largest panty raid in the University’s history.
700 KU students participate in what will be the final Nightshirt Parade, putting to bed a University tradition that stretches back more than half a century.
The KU Student Senate meets for the first time.
In what will be the final crowning of a Homecoming Queen, KU awards the tiara to Janet Merrick, a senior from Johnson County.
Student-run radio station KJHK-FM goes on the air with DJ Steve Doocy, bringing jazz, progressive and "alternative" rock to Mount Oread, along with a fair share of controversy.
A parade is held in honor of Harold “Hal” Sandy, creator of the smiling Jayhawk, commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of his version of the Jayhawk, which has served as the University’s mascot since 1946.
Kansas Alumni marks the 100th anniversary of KU alumni journals, an enterprise that began with the 1902 appearance of the Graduate Magazine and, in total, represents the University’s longest-running continuous publication.
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KU Today
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times