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November

Launching the Satellite Union

November 1, 1977

Ground is broken for the construction of the Satellite Student Union, now known as the Burge Student Union that was named in honor of Frank Burge, longtime director of the Kansas Union.

Fringe Benefits

November 4, 2005

The Kenneth Spencer Research Library marks the fortieth anniversary of the founding of the Wilcox Collection of Contemporary Political Movements, which takes as its mission the preservation of materials from America's radical political fringe.

Touchdowns And Tragedy

November 6, 1909

Quarterback Tommy Johnson runs his way into Jayhawk immortality with a 70-yard punt return for the only score in a KU gridiron victory over Nebraska.

Custer’s Last Standard Bearer

November 7, 1891

Death of the US Cavalry horse Comanche, once considered the sole American survivor of the Battle of Little Big Horn, whose preserved remains are now on display at the KU Museum of Natural History in Dyche Hall.

The Queen Is Dead

November 7, 1969

In what will be the final crowning of a Homecoming Queen, KU awards the tiara to Janet Merrick, a senior from Johnson County.

Honest Abraham

November 8, 1909

Carnegie Foundation researcher Abraham Flexner visits the KU School of Medicine, compiling data and making observations for his influential expose entitled "Medical Education in the United States and Canada."

A Football Fatality

November 14, 1896

With less than a minute to go in a football game at McCook Field between Nebraska’s Doane College and the University of Kansas, Bert Serf, a member of the visiting team, suffers a fatal injury while making a touchdown-saving tackle.

Bleacher Creature

November 15, 1946

Male students begin moving into makeshift quarters underneath the east-wing stands of Memorial Stadium, an emergency post-World War II housing arrangement known as McCook Hall.

Year Of The Pigskin

November 18, 1968

“Pepper” Rodgers, KU’s head football coach, announces via telephone to a crowd of 1,000 students gathered in front of Strong Hall that the Jayhawks are bound for their second Orange Bowl appearance.

Cause For Concern

November 18, 1971

Responding to campus radicalism and slashed state education budgets, a KU group called Students Concerned About Higher Education in Kansas publishes a bold advertisement that asks “WOULD YOU VOTE TO ABOLISH THE UNIVERSITY?”

From Sky-soar To Eyesore

November 20, 1967

KU unveils preliminary architectural plans for its new humanities building, later named Wescoe Hall, a 25-story skyscraper that would have been the tallest building in Kansas.

Unitarian Utilitarianism

November 21, 1914

Lawrence widow Leonora Ricker Hollingbery dies, leaving a last will and testment that calls for the establishment of a low-cost residence for women that will become an ad-hoc addition to KU's student housing stock for more than two decades.

No More Hobohemia

November 22, 1939

The University Daily Kansan records the passing of Hobo Day, an often rowdy “annual festival of rags” in which KU students dressed in hobo costumes to show school spirit and cause “a great deal of unnecessary trouble.”

All That Jazz

November 23, 1999

Richard “Dick” Wright, a music professor at KU, KANU radio personality and one of the two founders of KU’s Archive of Recorded Sound, passes away.

Tiger By The Tail

November 30, 1893

KU’s football squad squares off against its bitter rivals from the University of Missouri in the first Thanksgiving Day game between the two schools, inaugurating an 18-year tradition in which the Jayhawkers would dominate the Tigers.

Finger In The Dyche

November 30, 1932

After the state architect declares Dyche Hall structurally unsound, the Board of Regents closes KU’s Natural History Museum for a period that will end up lasting nine years.