Sign Up Twitter

Decades

1890 - 1899 (18 articles)

Bacteriology To The Future

September 5, 1894

Bacteriologist Marshall A. Barber, whose invention of the micropipette will enable him to conclusively prove the germ theory of disease, begins his 17-year teaching career at the University of Kansas and the KU School of Medicine.

Lightning Strikes…Twice

March 22, 1898

Fire destroys KU’s engineering building and heating plant, prompting Kansas City businessman George A. Fowler to donate $18,000 to rebuild the facilities, which became known as the Fowler Shops.

A Football Fatality

November 14, 1896

With less than a minute to go in a football game at McCook Field between Nebraska’s Doane College and the University of Kansas, Bert Serf, a member of the visiting team, suffers a fatal injury while making a touchdown-saving tackle.

Primary Colors

September 27, 1896

The University of Kansas football team dons crimson and blue uniforms for the first time.

Our Weekly Reader

June 3, 1895

After nearly twenty years of short-lived niche publications of uneven quality, a student-run newspaper, the Kansas University Weekly, emerges with the “official approval and support of the University.”

Water On The Brain

February 23, 1895

KU physics and engineering professor, Lucien I. Blake, successfully transmits the first long distance ship-to-shore message using underwater wireless technology.

A “Stupendous Windfall”

August 24, 1894

Dr. Simeon Bishop Bell, a Wyandotte County physician and real estate speculator, offers KU $75,000 in land and money to build a new hospital and medical college in present-day Kansas City, Kansas.

Northern Exposure

July 7, 1894

KU’s Lewis Lindsay Dyche leaves New York as official naturalist on the ill-starred Cook expedition to the North Pole.

Say You Want An Evolution

January 30, 1894

KU Chancellor Francis H. Snow announces that he will give a series of University Extension lectures on evolution, a move that provokes much criticism from local religious leaders.

Tiger By The Tail

November 30, 1893

KU’s football squad squares off against its bitter rivals from the University of Missouri in the first Thanksgiving Day game between the two schools, inaugurating an 18-year tradition in which the Jayhawkers would dominate the Tigers.

“Nothing Like It In The World”

May 1, 1893

The Panorama of North American Mammals, a version of which is now located in the University of Kansas Natural History Museum in Dyche Hall, debuts as the centerpiece of the Kansas pavilion at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

The Chateau That Blake Built

March 11, 1893

The Kansas Legislature authorizes $50,000 for the construction of a new physics and electrical engineering building, a striking structure resembling a French chateau now remembered as “old” Blake Hall.

Custer’s Last Standard Bearer

November 7, 1891

Death of the US Cavalry horse Comanche, once considered the sole American survivor of the Battle of Little Big Horn, whose preserved remains are now on display at the KU Museum of Natural History in Dyche Hall.

A Rivalry Is Born

October 31, 1891

The flagship universities of Kansas and Missouri initiate what will become one of the oldest rivalries in NCAA Division IA football. Unfortunately, with MU's seceding from the Big 12 in 2011, the rivalry is on hold.

Mayday Mayhem

May 1, 1891

Male students participate in the first "Maypole Scrap," a rowdy fracas that will be a KU tradition and popular spectator sport for over a dozen years.

Driven Snow

April 11, 1890

The Kansas Board of Regents elects natural science professor Francis H. Snow the University’s fifth chancellor.

Eight Is Enough

April 2, 1890

Eight KU professors establish the University’s chapter of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa honor society, the first west of the Mississippi and the 31st nationwide.