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Articles

A “Stupendous Windfall”

August 24, 1894

Dr. Simeon Bishop Bell, a Wyandotte County physician and real estate speculator, offers KU $75,000 in land and money to build a new hospital and medical college in present-day Kansas City, Kansas.

Bacteriology To The Future

September 5, 1894

Bacteriologist Marshall A. Barber, whose invention of the micropipette will enable him to conclusively prove the germ theory of disease, begins his 17-year teaching career at the University of Kansas and the KU School of Medicine.

Water On The Brain

February 23, 1895

KU physics and engineering professor, Lucien I. Blake, successfully transmits the first long distance ship-to-shore message using underwater wireless technology.

Our Weekly Reader

June 3, 1895

After nearly twenty years of short-lived niche publications of uneven quality, a student-run newspaper, the Kansas University Weekly, emerges with the “official approval and support of the University.”

Primary Colors

September 27, 1896

The University of Kansas football team dons crimson and blue uniforms for the first time.

A Football Fatality

November 14, 1896

With less than a minute to go in a football game at McCook Field between Nebraska’s Doane College and the University of Kansas, Bert Serf, a member of the visiting team, suffers a fatal injury while making a touchdown-saving tackle.

Lightning Strikes…Twice

March 22, 1898

Fire destroys KU’s engineering building and heating plant, prompting Kansas City businessman George A. Fowler to donate $18,000 to rebuild the facilities, which became known as the Fowler Shops.

Breaking With The Past

September 10, 1902

Carl L. Becker, author of the much-reprinted essay “Kansas” and one of the central figures in the development of the nature of historical inquiry, begins teaching his first European history class at the University of Kansas.